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Is Your Team Committed?iStock_000001330317Small

“The difference between involvement and commitment is like ham and eggs. The chicken is involved; the pig is committed.” ~ Martina Navratilova

Do you have a committed team?  Commitment to a goal is necessary to reach the goal. Without that commitment, a team is simply a group of people.

“A group is a collection of individuals who coordinate their individual efforts. On the other hand, at team is a group of people who share a common team purpose and a number of challenging goals. Members of the team are mutually committed to the goals and to each other. This mutual commitment also creates joint accountability which creates a strong bond and a strong motivation to perform.”  ~ Jim Sisson

Seven Signs Your Team Is Lacking Commitment:

  • Object to team goals without offering alternatives
  • Fail to engage
  • Let obvious errors or mistakes slide by without comment
  • Fail to meet deadlines or other obligations
  • Debate endlessly about recurring topics
  • Engage in sidebar or hallway conversations (blame others)
  • Complain about being busy, or about work demands, rather than getting work done

Gaining commitment is one of the Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team. Commitment reflects the team’s clarity around decisions, as well as its ability to move forward with complete buy-in from every member of the team, even those who initially disagreed with the decision.

Three Ways to Build Team Commitment

To build a cohesive team, try adopting these three behaviors.

  • Debate: Make sure people have the chance to debate decisions and voice objections.
  • Clarity: End meetings with a clear and specific summary of decisions.
  • Buy-in: Remember that all members have the responsibility to commit to decisions, even if they don’t agree with them.

Ask yourself the question – is your team committed like the pig, or just involved like the chicken?

Source: The Business Journals, “The difference between a group and a team,” Jim Sisson, June 14, 2013